Salmon recipes for my June @AlbertaatNoon column

My Grizzly Bear Salmon with greens and edible flowers photo - Karen Anderson

My Grizzly Bear Salmon with greens and edible flowers
photo – Karen Anderson

This month on Alberta at Noon I’m talking about a sustainable Community Supported Fishery called Skipper Otto’s CSF. This post will share some of my favourite ways to use the beautiful wild B.C. salmon these fishermen catch when the salmon runs come in off the coast of British Columbia each summer. Salmon is a great ingredient and a favourite ingredient around my home. My family savours it all.

Grizzly Bear Salmon
I love the idea of eating a Grizzly’s summer feast of salmon, greens and berries.
1 cedar plank
2 lb salmon fillet
1 cup water or dry white wine
1 cup sugar
1 Tbsp lemon juice
2 cups haskap berries (honeyberries), blueberries or Saskatoon berries
1 pkg of spring mesclun mix
Edible flowers – pansies, nasturtiums, petunias, chive flowers, geranium petals

Soak the cedar plank in water for at least 8 hours.
Rinse the salmon, pat it dry and place it in a sealable plastic bag.
Combine the water (or wine), sugar and lemon juice in a saucepan on medium heat and cook until the sugar dissolves, stirring occasionally to help it along.
Add the berries of your choice and simmer until the sauce thickens – about 10 minutes and then let it cool.
Add the sauce to the salmon (reserve about ¾ cup) and marinate overnight or at least 4 – 6 hours.
Heat both sides of your grill.
Take the cedar plank out of the water and dry it off.
Remove the salmon from the marinade and place it on the plank keeping as many berries on top of the fish as possible.
Place the plank on one side of your grill and turn that side down to low while keeping the other on high.
Close the lid and cook for 10 minutes per inch of thickness of the salmon, checking on it every 5 minutes* to make sure the cedar does not catch on fire – the average salmon fillet will take 15 to 20 minutes to cook.
Remove the salmon and plank from the grill.
Remove the salmon from the plank to a platter lined with greens and decorate with edible flowers and then drizzle with the reserved berry sauce.
Or if you are having a more rustic buffet, leave the salmon on the plank and serve the salad on the side.
Dig in like a hungry grizzly.
*Note – Have a water spritzer nearby in case of fire – if you see lots of smoke from the grill – investigate! The cedar plank should really just release its sauna of perfume and not too much smoke.

Other salmon recipes caught in one line:
Combine 2 Tbsp honey, 1 Tbsp sambal olek and 1 tsp of toasted sesame oil and spread over a salmon fillet and grill till medium-rare (an old Bonnie Stern recipe).
Spread a salmon fillet with pesto and grill as above. Serve with a platter of fresh tomatoes that have been sliced and drizzled with olive oil, balsamic vinegar and torn basil leaves.
Spread a salmon fillet with equal parts Dijon mustard, birch syrup and brown sugar and grill as above.
Place a salmon fillet on a double layer of foil and coat it with olive oil and salt and pepper. Grill to medium rare and serve with a salsa made of 2 cups of chopped cherry tomatoes, salt and pepper, ¼ cup of torn basil leaves, 2 Tbsp olive oil and 1 Tbsp of balsamic vinegar.

Got leftover salmon?
Cut the salmon into bite-sized bits and toss on top of a bed of greens with celery slices, avocado chunks and fresh blueberries. Drizzle with avocado oil and dress with Maldon salt just before serving.

Salad worthy of my Grizzly Bear Salmon photo - Karen Anderson

Salad worthy of my Grizzly Bear Salmon
photo – Karen Anderson

3 Comments

Filed under Alberta at Noon, Great ingredients, Recipes

3 responses to “Salmon recipes for my June @AlbertaatNoon column

  1. Rob Hutchinson

    These sound, and look, fabulous Karen. Talk about eating first with your eyes! I grill our salmon even simpler: ground pepper, garlic powder, and a sprinkling of Salish alderwood smoked sea salt ( from Justapinch.ca). Delish, and the simplicity really let’s the salmon flavour sing through. Cheers, Rob

    Like

  2. Hi Rob,
    YUM. I’m going to get some of that Salish alder wood sea salt. It sounds like the perfect note for your singing salmon to hit.
    Thanks for the suggestion and website.
    Cheers to you up in beautiful St. Albert.
    Karen

    Like

  3. Pingback: My June @AlbertaatNoon podcast – @skipperotto community supported fishery comes to Alberta weekly for 2014 season | Savour It All

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