Tag Archives: Liane Faulder

Enjoy an Edible Escapes weekend in #Chicago this October with my friend Liane Faulder

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The Windy City – photo credit – Karen Anderson

There are some cities you just don’t want to miss and Chicago is one of them. I’ve had the pleasure of travelling there three times in the last two years and so when my friend Liane Faulder said it was top of her bucket list, I designed a great trip for her to lead with my company Alberta Food Tours, Inc.

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Great article on @albertafoodtour @AlbertaBoostR in The Edmonton Examiner today – Food tour entrepreneur eyes Edmonton eateries – by Madeleine Cummings

Food tours coming to Edmonton. Here’s the article from The Edmonton Examiner Source: Food tour entrepreneur eyes Edmonton eateries

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@postmedianet @CalgaryHerald @EdmontonJournal cut access to #local editorial food content with layoffs of @gwendolynmr #GwendolynRichards and @eatmywords #LianeFaulder

I’ve always looked forward to opening The Calgary Herald on Wednesday morning. I knew there would be food content that was editorial and journalistic. Whether it was her Cooking the Books review column or the scoop on a new development in Calgary’s burgeoning food scene, Gwendolyn Richards wrote with savvy and gave a voice to stories that would make a difference in our community.

I met The Edmonton Journal’s (until yesterday) food editor, Liane Faulder a few years ago when she was teaching a food writing course at The Okanagan Food and Wine Writer’s Workshop. I watched her in the field as she interviewed a pioneer in the seed saving movement, synthesized the data and crafted a story which she then filed for print the next day. If you scan the headlines of that paper’s food blog it’s easy to see her dedication to covering the stories of Edmonton’s food scene and to imagine the impact of those stories.

Both these journalists had the ability to judge the impact of stories that would be important for their community. They made a difference for fledgling restaurant businesses, chefs, farmers, food artisans, cookbook authors and cross-cultural food community events.

I wonder how news about local food projects will be shared now? We’ve lost two trusted critical thinkers. You can be doing great work as a food business but unless there’s an objective editorial voice to share that with your community it can make or break your project’s success.

Today, when I read the paper I found a long-standing recipe advert-orial column sponsored by the local gas utility and a collection of food photos from Twitter and Instagram. The photos and their one sentence tag lines don’t seem to contribute meaningful impact for the broader community given their propensity to glittering generalities and myopic focus.

I know this content helps newspapers pay their bills but, sometimes it seems newspapers are turning into a print version of Pinterest. The publishers “pin” stories from news feeds and patch together a scrapbook for publication each day. I’m not sure this is a great strategy as consumers can find that content themselves – very easily and in much more beautiful formats.

If content is king, then it is no wonder our local papers are turning into paupers.

Local papers have always been about local content. If that is missing, the local paper will be less and less compelling as a part of local culture (culture as in DAILY LIFE and HABITS). The last bastions of local content in local papers seem to be backgrounder columnists for politics, business, finance and human interest breaking stories. But, let’s face it, breaking news is old news if you wait to receive it in paper format each morning and so is the re-hashing of it.

I value original story journalism and observe with solemnity the bleeding edge of print media and its declining subscriptions. But, instead of holding onto their strength – the provision of depth and variety in local original content for local interest – newspapers that let go of local content experts take the leading edge that they had and add to that bleeding edge that’s slowly (or not so slowly) killing them.

We just lost two golden keys that opened the gateways to understanding our food scene as a piece of our local culture. To use an analogy from the food world, restaurants that take favourite features off the menu frequently fail in entirety shortly thereafter. I’ll see what the Calgary Herald’s Friday Swerve Calgary and Saturday food section continue to bring, but in all honesty, reading today’s paper felt like “the day the music died” for me. I’ll be looking elsewhere in my efforts to savour it all.

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Cool things no. 14 – @calgaryfoodtour included in @eatmywords @edmontonjournal review of Calgary food scene today and the power of encouraging words

Tracey Aubin of Terra Farms talks to guests and me (in red at back) about growing fresh herbs and how they help us savour our food photo credit and thanks to- Leilani Olynik of Calgary Farmer's Market

Tracey Aubin of Terra Farms talks to guests and me (in red at back) about growing fresh herbs and how they help us savour our food
photo credit and thanks to- Leilani Olynik of Calgary Farmer’s Market

Calgary restaurant scene impresses foodies on tour.

I’m very grateful that my small business, Calgary Food Tours Inc. was mentioned in this article by The Edmonton Journal‘s Liane Faulder. This was a very cool thing for me today and showed me the power of encouraging words.

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Savour fine writing – the value of a mentor to inspire and teach – @eatmywords Liane Faulder: Raw milk a key ingredient in some of the world’s finest cheeses

Me and Liane Faulder, friend and writing mentor September 2013

Me and Liane Faulder, friend and writing mentor
September 2013

I count myself blessed that I have a few very fine writing mentors. My friend dee Hobsbawn-Smith has always encouraged me to write and been there with kindness. My editor at City Palate Magazine, Kathy Richardier, has invested a great deal of time in making me a better writer and I owe a lot to her insistence on brevity, her eagle eye for clarity and her sense of readability, tone and overall worthiness of a piece. In Jennifer Cockrall-King, the founder of The Okanagan Food and Wine Writers Workshop (OKFWWW), I have found collegiality, escape from a writer’s solitary life and a generosity of spirit that reveals a deep belief in abundance and the power of collaboration.

It was at the OKFWWW that I met Liane Faulder. This post will talk more about what I have learned from Faulder in particular and share an article she recently wrote on raw milk in Canada.

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