Tag Archives: Winter’s Turkeys

Happy #Thanksgiving – Our Canadian version makes The New York Times

It’s pumpkin time – photo credit – Karen Anderson

It’s Thanksgiving weekend here in Canada. It’s time to savour food, savour life and savour it all.

In most of the country the narrow daylight that Diana Krall so achingly croons about shines softly on trees glowing with amber, scarlet, magenta and gold leaves. Farmers’ markets bulge with pumpkins ready to line walkways and front porch steps. People take long walks and come home rosy-cheeked and ready to sip a little cider. The transition from summer to winter is long and lingering – languid even.

That’s most of the country. Meanwhile here in Calgary, we woke up to our first blizzard this morning and a blanket of white snow now covers my lawn. That’s life in this land where Rocky mountain steeples tower over these wind-swept and often parches and brittle Prairies below. Still we’ve cause for excitement as we huddle around the fireplace this weekend.

Earlier in the week, local cookbook author extraordinaire Julie Van Rosendaal asked her friends and followers what would be a uniquely Albertan Thanksgiving food? The New York Times had called and wanted her to contribute.

Wowza!

I hoped Julie would be able to write about Winter’s Turkeys because of their humane animal husbandry practices and the taste that results from all the TLC they bestow on their bountiful birds but alas, turkey was already taken. Julie came up with the perfect solution. She wrote about infusing turkey leftovers into something all Albertans love – pirogies

Here’s the article: Favorite Thanksgiving Recipes from Across Canada. Too bad they didn’t spell favourite the Canadian way, eh? Just kidding. The research is thorough. All 10 provinces and three territories are covered and I learned a lot about my own country.

What are your favourite recipes for Canadian Thanksgiving?

I’ll be brining my Winter’s Turkey in a soy and oh so Canadian maple solution before roasting it to bronzed perfection. I’ll make brussel sprouts with bacon, rutabaga puff, sesame coleslaw, Yukon Gold mashes spuds, golden beets with pistachio dressing, herb and mushroom stuffing, tomato aspic and softly spiced orange cranberry sauce. There will be a butternut squash soup to start and a golden apple Tarte Tatin with vanilla ice cream for dessert.

I’ve so much to be thankful for. I hope you and your family and friends enjoy a bounty as rich as Canada’s wherever you may live. It was nice that The New York Times described our food and favourite recipes but just between you and me, I think they missed the thing all Canadians are most grateful for. It’s the fact that we are Canadians.

Happy Thanksgiving indeed.

 

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Filed under Savour life

Savour food – at the source – my work with @CityPalate Foodie Tootle farm tours

Alberta harvest time land and skyscape photo from a moving bus - Karen Anderson

Alberta harvest time land and skyscape
photo from a moving bus – Karen Anderson

I just spent the better part of the last week planning, shopping, cooking, packing up, catering and leading a Foodie Tootle tour to four farms in one day for 43 guests. I’m pooped out but proud of the amazing farmers we visited yesterday and all the goodies my guests were able to gather for their Thanksgiving dinners next weekend.

I’m going to blog a little bit about each of the four farmers we visited this week. Those farms include the following:
Poplar Bluff Organics
Winter’s Turkeys
Highwood Crossing and the
The Saskatoon Farm.

All through this week, I’ll share some of the recipes these farms have inspired along with some of my family’s favourites.

Meanwhile, if you are wondering what a Foodie Tootle is, I hope you will enjoy this piece I wrote for City Palate describing the origin of the Foodie Tootle farm tours, their goals and what that typical experience looks and feels like.

cp_so13_tootles.pdf

Did you read the article? Here’s a sample of one of my Bad Turkey Jokes.
Why did the turkey cross the road? It was the chicken’s day off.

Here’s a better punch line to make up for that.

Apple Jack Frost Nipping at your Nose Punch
4 liters apple cider
1 bottle sparkling wine
2 cups Calvados
2 t. Fee Brothers whiskey barrel-aged bitters
Iced apple ring
Combine all of the above in a punch bowl and serve promptly upon guests arrival for a smooth opening to your holiday party. Make the ice ring by slicing 6 apples thinly, overlap them on the bottom of a ring mold, add just enough water so they’ll freeze in position, freeze, then fill the mold with water and freeze again until needed.

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Filed under Farms, Farming and Farmers, Recipes