Category Archives: Alberta at Noon

#Bread is on the Rise – My CBC @AlbertaatNoon food column podcast

sourdough bread by Aviv Fried at Sidewalk Citizen bakery in Calgary - photo credit - Karen Anderson

Fresh bread from Aviv Fried’s Sidewalk Citizen Bakery is made with local flour from Highwood Crossing Organic Farms and Grainworks – photo credit – Karen Anderson

Here’s my CBC Alberta at Noon Column “Bread is on the Rise” on the return of sourdough to our culture. I’m on at the 12:06 mark with host Donna McElligott. You’ll find the recipe for making your own sourdough here and recipes for No Knead Bread here.

The most popular post on this blog is actually about bread.

I captured an old Swedish family recipe of my husband’s Anderson family for Halvtjock Kakor. It’s been really wonderful to watch how many people have found it useful and how many have taken a moment to comment on it. Rightly so, it’s very tasty business and has helped my family savour it all at our get-togethers for many years now. Mmmm – nothing like bread straight from the oven. Somebody please pass the butter.

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Alberta at Noon, Heritage cooking skills

#Sourdough bread – history and methods – my @AlbertaatNoon column for May

sourdough cinnamon buns near Whitehorse, Yukon Territory - photo credit - Karen Anderson

Sourdough at Haines Junction Yukon Territory – photo credit – Karen Anderson

Keeping a sourdough starter requires some planning and dedication but for those that love the tangy taste, crumb infiltrated with air pockets and a thin but firm crust, it’s definitely worth the bother. This post will share some of the history and technique involved in building your own sourdough starter. Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Alberta at Noon, Heritage cooking skills, Recipes, Uncategorized

2 #recipes for No Knead Bread – my @AlbertaatNoon column for May

No Knead Bread is not new. It became famous when Mark Bittman wrote a New York Times article about it a decade ago in 2006. I’m going to talk about the recent comeback of bread’s popularity and the rise of sourdough breads in this post “wheat belly” era for my CBC Alberta at Noon column tomorrow. But, after researching sourdough I know the art of working with this living breathing organism will not be for everyone so that’s why I’m posting two simple No Knead Bread recipes here. Give the dough lots of time to rise and the yeast will have time to begin digesting the sugar and proteins in the flour for you.

No Knead Breads are definitely something anyone can do and most importantly – enjoy! Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Alberta at Noon, Recipes

#Bread is on the rise – my @AlbertaatNoon column for May

Despite being punched down by the “wheat belly” gluten-free movement, bread is once again on the rise. Why is bread making a comeback? Maybe it’s because gluten (the protein found in wheat responsible for giving bread it’s elasticity) wasn’t the evil culprit some claimed it to be. With the exception of people who have Celiac Disease or actual allergies to wheat, gluten hasn’t shown harmful effects on humans in any solid research trials.

Bread has been “the staff of life” for thousands of years and wheat is the most commonly eaten substance in the world. Wheat varietals have evolved with plant breeding and natural selection. They’ve been tolerated well.

Michael Pollan, in his book Cooked – A Natural History of Transformation (Penguin, 2013) delves deeply into the bread box to conclude that perhaps it’s not the wheat that’s the problem; perhaps it is all the additives in commercially prepared bread combined with a lack of time spent making that same bread.

Time is important in bread making. Time allows the yeasts and bacteria in our environment to do their thing which turns out to be really important for the health of humans. What do they do? They combine with bread’s flour and water and if given the time, they will “eat” the sugars in the flour, produce the gas that causes dough to rise and most importantly for people that find wheat hard to digest; they partially digest the proteins (like gluten) in flour for us.

I hope you’ll watch the 2015 CBC Fifth Estate video above that probed into the “war on wheat” and that you’ll tune into my CBC Alberta at Noon show tomorrow, Friday, May 27 between noon and 1230 p.m. on 99.1 FM when I’ll talk more about how to get rolling in the dough – with sourdough and a few easier bread recipes.

2 Comments

Filed under Alberta at Noon, Health

Summer Cooking Camps for Kids in #Alberta – my @AlbertaatNoon Column for April, 2016

cooking utensils - @savouritall blog

Some of my favourite cooking utensils – photo credit – Geoff Lilge

Entrepreneurs invent business opportunities to meet societal needs. Few parents have the time or skill to teach their children to cook. Few schools include cooking in their curriculums and yet, thanks to the work of food educators like Jamie Oliver we know we need to reconnect children to food literacy and cooking skills. Enter the entrepreneur.

Need creates opportunity and here’s the response – this post contains a list of very entrepreneurial summer cooking camps for kids around Alberta this summer. Continue reading

3 Comments

Filed under Alberta at Noon, Health

My favourite #TEDtalk of all time – Teach every child about food by @JamieOliver

If I tell you this is the my favourite TEDTalk will you take the time to watch the video above? I hope you will but maybe you don’t have 20 minutes so I’ll give you the “Cole’s Notes” version of the video’s message in this post. Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Alberta at Noon, Health

#CookingWithKids – an easy #recipe for Polenta Lasagna

polenta lasagna recipe - photo credit - Karen Anderson

Polenta Lasagna – photo credit – Karen Anderson

This month on CBC Radio One’s Alberta at Noon I’ll be talking about the importance of cooking skills for children. I believe cooking is a basic life skill that determines how healthy an individual and in turn a family will be.

A lack of ability to cook from scratch leads to a life dependent on processed foods. Processed foods are more likely to contain excess salt, sugar and food additives and a diet filled with processed foods is more likely to cause obesity.

Harvard University says the health consequences of obesity include heart disease, diabetes, stroke, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, sleep apnea, asthma, some cancers, susceptibility to depression due to discrimination and the emotional impact of that. Thirty per cent of youth are now obese.

We are three generations since the norm was a stay at home homemaker and cook for each family. Many parents (let alone their children) lack cooking skills beyond reheating, microwaving and combining packaged foods. Women in the 1960s were told cooking was a chore and they needed to be emancipated from the kitchen. Women did go out to work but instead of “freedom” they now work outside the home and still do the majority of household work as well. Equal partnerships are slow to evolve. Reframing cooking as a family activity and a creative way to nurture, care and ensure health for ourselves and our children could go a long way to correcting our society’s obesity epidemic.

I developed the Polenta lasagna recipe in this post to act as a cooking skills bridge from reliance on highly processed packaged food to cooking with healthier choices. The result is a fun assembly of quality ingredients with delicious results. Older children can make it on their own. Parents and younger children can make this together. Continue reading

5 Comments

Filed under Alberta at Noon, Health, Recipes